Cover of: The Nixon administration and the making of U.S. nuclear strategy | Terry Terriff

The Nixon administration and the making of U.S. nuclear strategy

  • 252 Pages
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by
Cornell University Press , Ithaca
Nuclear weapons -- United States, Deterrence (Strategy), United States -- Politics and government -- 1969-1974, United States -- Military p

Places

United States, United St

StatementTerry Terriff.
SeriesCornell studies in security affairs
Classifications
LC ClassificationsUA23 .T43 1995
The Physical Object
Paginationxvi, 252 p. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1118996M
ISBN 100801430828
LC Control Number94045262

Henry Kissinger’s periodic attempts to energize the Nixon administration to reform U.S. nuclear strategy indirectly bore fruit in In July of that year he was informed by Secretary of Defense Melvin Laird that the Department of Defense had recently completed a study of U.S.

nuclear targeting policy. North Charles Street Baltimore, Maryland, USA +1 () [email protected] © Project MUSE. Produced by Johns Hopkins University Cited by: 8. In this book, I examine the innovation of U.S.

strategic nuclear doctrine by the Nixon administrations from to Schlesinger claimed that the new targeting policy was needed because, with the coming of strategic parity, the U.S.

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nuclear deterrent extended to Western Europe was no longer credible and the Soviet Union had gained a. Download PDF The Making Of Strategy book full free.

The Making Of Strategy available for download and read online in other formats. The Nixon Administration and the Making of U.S. Nuclear Strategy. Terry Terriff — Political Science. Author: announced that the United States would change its nuclear targeting policy from.

Cornell University Press fosters a culture of broad and sustained inquiry through the publication of scholarship that is engaged, influential, and of lasting significance.

The Nixon Administration and the Making of U.S. Nuclear Strategy by Terry Terriff | Hardcover | Cornell University Press. For a comprehensive study of the Foster Panel, based largely on interviews, see Terry Terriff, The Nixon Administration and the Making of U.S.

Nuclear Strategy (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, ). Get this from a library. The Nixon administration and the making of U.S. nuclear strategy. [Terry Terriff] -- In Richard Nixon's defense secretary, James Schlesinger, announced that the United States would change its nuclear targeting policy from "assured destruction" to "limited nuclear options." In.

In Richard Nixon's defense secretary, James Schlesinger, announced that the United States would change its nuclear targeting policy from "assured destruction" to "limited nuclear options." In this account of the Schlesinger Doctrine based on newly declassified documents and extensive Price: $   Keith L.

Nelson, The Making of Détente: Soviet-American Relations in the Shadow of Vietnam Terry Terriff, The Nixon Administration and the Making of U.S. Nuclear Strategy There is a curious and interesting disjunction between the accounts in the two books here under review.

Both deal with “making” American policy in the Nixon years, one focusing on U.S. détente policy toward the Author: Raymond L. Garthoff. The U.S. has scores of missiles aboard its hidden submarines, and according to a new study by Global Zero, Russia, even caught off-guard by a U.

opened with a statement that "The fundamental mission of U.S. nuclear forces is to deter nuclear war, and plans for the employment of U.S. nuclear forces should support this mission" (p. Terrilf has written an excellent account of what the Nixon administration did in fashioning a revised nuclear strategic targeting policy for deterrence.

Nixon began giving responsibility for maintaining defense to those countries the U.S. had been defending How did détente represent a new direction in U.S. foreign policy. Instead of fighting communism openly, Nixon focused on negotiations with Communist countries. The risky gambit failed to move the Soviets, but it marked a turning point in the administration's strategy for exiting Vietnam.

Nixon and Kissinger became increasingly resigned to a "long-route" policy of providing Saigon with a "decent chance" of survival for a "decent interval" after a negotiated settlement and U.S. forces left by: 5.

Nixon at the Movies: A Book about Belief. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, Fitzgerald, Carol B., Terry. The Nixon Administration and the Making of U.S. Nuclear Strategy. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, Edwin L. "Domestic Policy Making in the Nixon Administration: An Evolving Process.". Jeffrey Kimball, Emeritus Professor, History Department, Miami University, wrote the prize-winning books, Nixon's Vietnam War (), and The Vietnam War Files: Uncovering the Secret History of Nixon-Era Strategy().With National Security Archive analyst William Burr, he wrote, "Nixon's Secret Nuclear Alert: Vietnam War Diplomacy and the Joint Chiefs of Staff Readiness Test, October.

Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, – Ap ) was the 37th president of the United States, serving from until The nation's 36th vice president from tohe came to national prominence as a representative and senator from five years in the White House that saw the conclusion to the U.S.

involvement in the Vietnam War, and the establishment of the Preceded by: Lyndon B.

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Johnson. The presidency of Richard Nixon began at noon EST on Januwhen Richard Nixon was inaugurated as 37th President of the United States, and ended on August 9,when he resigned in the face of almost certain impeachment and removal from office, the only U.S. president ever to do so.

He was succeeded by Gerald Ford, whom he had appointed Vice President after Spiro Agnew was forced Cabinet: See list. The counterforce idea came to a prominent place in strategic thinking in the Nixon administration and, together with the notion of limited nuclear war, was articulated as policy by Secretary of.

Nixon's Nuclear Specter book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. In their initial effort to end the Vietnam War, Richard Nixon and /5. The Carter Administration and the Evolution of American Nuclear Nonproliferation Policy, – Volume 14 “ Reality and Responsibility: Power and Process in the Making of United States Nuclear Strategy, –68,” Journal of see, for example, Terriff, Terry, The Nixon Administration and the Making of U.S.

Nuclear Cited by:   Washington D.C., Janu - On 24 February Secretary of Defense Melvin Laird’s inbox included a Joint Chiefs of Staff message concerning the ongoing efforts by military planners to develop a “Communist Chinese Nuclear Package” for the Single Integrated Operational Plan, the Pentagon’s nuclear war plan.

Laird’s office was mistakenly included in the message’s. B) was the first president to commit U.S. military personnel to Vietnam. C) was the first U.S. leader to commit American financial resources to fighting the Communists in Vietnam. D) was more committed to the implementation of containment policy than his predecessors had been.

The risky gambit failed to move the Soviets, but it marked a turning point in the administration's strategy for exiting Vietnam.

Nixon and Kissinger became increasingly resigned to a “long-route” policy of providing Saigon with a “decent chance” of survival for a “decent interval” after a negotiated settlement and U.S. forces left. -- the nixon and administration. jeff had written a major book on nixon and the vietnam war, while i had written on kissinger and was trying to get documents on the alert declassified.

more research and eventually had enough source material to write an article. it's published in cold war history in early we give the first full account of the alert and argued that the readiness test as it. [2] For U.S.-India relations during the Nixon administration, see Dennix Kux, India and the United States: Estranged Democracies, (Washington, D.C.: National Defense University Press, ),and Perkovich, India’s Nuclear Bomb,   Richard Nixon (), the 37th U.S.

president, is best remembered as the only president ever to resign from office. Nixon stepped down inhalfway.

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The catastrophic nature of the U.S. nuclear war plan, the Single Integrated Operational Plan (SIOP), made Nixon and Kissinger wonder if there was a less suicidal, more credible way to make nuclear threats meaningful and reduce the danger of all-out nuclear war in the event of a superpower confrontation.

The risky gambit failed to move the Soviets, but it marked a turning point in the administration's strategy for exiting Vietnam. Nixon and Kissinger became increasingly resigned to a "long-route" policy of providing Saigon with a "decent chance" of survival for a "decent interval" after a negotiated settlement and U.S.

forces left : Jeffrey P. Kimball. “William Burr and Jeffrey Kimball deserve praise for their discerning and cogent reconstruction of the motives and actions of the Nixon Administration to its first year.

Students interested in the Vietnam War or the Cold War more generally will learn a great deal from Nixon’s Nuclear Specter. Nixon's Nuclear Specter: The Secret Alert ofMadman Diplomacy, and the Vietnam War (Modern War Studies) - Kindle edition by Kimball, Jeffrey P., Burr, William.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Nixon's Nuclear Specter: The Secret Alert ofMadman Diplomacy, and the /5(7).

Washington, D.C., J – “Launch-on-warning,” a feature of U.S. nuclear warfighting strategy since the late s, has frequently faced intensive criticism because of the high risk of accidental launches and uncontrollable outcomes, including massive casualties, according to recently declassified records posted today by the nongovernmental National Security Archive.Presidential aides say that there has been no fundamental change in U.S.

nuclear strategy in this administration. They stress that President Reagan has said there can be no winners in a nuclear war.No explanation of international politics in the nuclear age will be complete without it.' Joel H. Rosenthal - President, Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs ‘Nina Tannenwald has written a powerful and provocative book examining the influence of ethical norms on U Cited by: